Dango – Syracuse NYC ’46

Django in Syracuse NYC –
30th Nov 1946

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Dave Salmon, Inc. offered a unique snapshot of the type of cultural activities available to Syracusans in the post-war period. Events represented include plays (“The Seven Year Itch,” “Macbeth”), operas (“The Barber of Seville,” “Cavalleria Rusticana”), concerts (The Philadelphia Orchestra, Duke Ellington, Guy Lombardo, the Trapp Family Singers), lectures (news analyst Lowell Thomas), and variety performances (“Spike Jones and His Musical Depreciation Review,” Adolphe Menjou). Most of the performances took place at the Lincoln Auditorium at Central High School; other venues include the Jefferson Street Armory, and the Keith’s TheatreMiscellaneous material includes the company’s copy of their contract with Duke Ellington.

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Photo with Django Front Centre Stage of the Orchestra:-
Courtesy of Roger S Baxter

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Photo with Django Front Centre Stage of the Orchestra:-
Courtesy of Roger S Baxter

Dave Salmon Inc (Presents) was a promoter of fine arts performances in Syracuse, NYC. programs and tickets for plays, operas, concerts, lectures, and variety performances in the 1940s and 1950s. 

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DjangoProgSee the ‘large for the period’ White Amplifier to the left of Django with Gibson ES-300 and that smaller closed striped case at his immediate ‘left’ which also appears on the Pla Mor Ballroom picture with a small black amp connection box which is on edge to the camera. 

Anyone have any ideas on what this state of the art then Amplification arrangement was – early ‘Vibrator‘ type power unit or pre-amp perhaps?

Could that case be the pre-amp controls and the White Box just simply a 2/3 speaker housing?

Rex Stewart – In my opinion, out of the ten great guitarists in the world, Django is 5 of them!

Central’s haunting Lincoln Auditorium, a performing arts centre of such fine acoustics that it was once home to the Syracuse Symphony Orchestra. “This is Syracuse’s answer to Carnegie Hall,” said a reverent Lindsay Groves, a cellist with the symphony.

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